AUGUST 11, 2018 • 12–8 • Norway, Maine

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Local Food Systems Work.

We have the people, land and climate needed to produce fresh, affordable, and healthy food, renewable energy, shelter and the things we use daily. A community food system integrates food production, processing, distribution, consumption and disposal to enhance the environmental, economic, social and nutritional health of a particular place. Learn what a local food system looks like here in Norway, Maine.

Education

Our growing community of farmers, entrepreneurs, producers and consumers can create strong local economies by creating new locally owned businesses and jobs. Local food systems work will feature Local Food Councils, Farm to School, 4-H and the Cooperative Extension, the local USDA office, nutrition education, the Maine Food Atlas, and culinary arts.

Bonnie Rukin is a social change activist from Camden, Maine. She has worked as a teacher, organic farmer, lay homeopath and non-profit leader at varied times in the past several decades. Her values and community actions have focused on sustainability in organizations and their related missions in the areas of health, philanthropy, education, social justice, agriculture and the environment. Since January 2010 she has been the Coordinator of Slow Money Maine, happily finding a match for her skills, interests and life experiences in leading a diverse and inclusive network of over 400 people actively engaged in varied forms of investing in local sustainable food systems. TedXDirigo

 

 

“How do we, as people who care about growing and eating healthy food, ‘step up to the plate’ as we build local food economies, wherever we live, in this changing culture?”

Maine Farmland Trust is a statewide organization that protects farmland, supports farmers, and advances farming. Their goal is not just to protect Maine farmland, but to revitalize Maine’s rural landscape by keeping agricultural lands working and helping farmers, and their communities, thrive.

 

Maine Farmland Trust

97 Main Street, Belfast, Maine 04915

(207) 338-6575

 

Web: mainefarmlandtrust.org

Contact: email

Facebook: mainefarmlandtrust

Twitter: @Mainefarms

 

Marge Kilkelly is the Senior Policy Advisor for US Senator Angus King since 2009. She is a graduate of Southern New Hampshire University in Community Economic Development and lives in Dresden Mills, Maine where she owns and operates Dragonfly Cove Farm. Kilkelly has also worked at the Deputy Director of the Eastern Region of the Council of State Governments and is a past president of the New England Farmers' Union.

 

Photos: Angus King and Marge Kilkelly with Chellie Pingree

July 25, 2017, FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Maine Food System Leaders to Address Foothills Food Festival

 

Organizers of the 2nd Annual Foothills Food Festival are pleased to welcome two of Maine’s leading local food advocates to speak at this year’s event in Norway on August 12th from 12 noon until 9pm. Bonnie Rukin of Slow Money Maine and Marge Kilkelly, Senior Policy Advisor to Senator Angus King will both speak from the main stage on issues critical to our food future. Both talks will be in the afternoon with exact times still being worked out.

 

Bonnie Rukin is a social change activist from Camden, Maine. Her values and community actions have focused on sustainability in organizations and their related missions in the areas of health, philanthropy, education, social justice, agriculture and the environment. After working as a teacher, organic farmer, lay homeopath and non-profit leader at varied times over the past several decades, Rukin has served as the Coordinator of Slow Money Maine (SMM) since 2010, “happily finding a match for her skills, interests and life experiences.” SMM is a diverse and inclusive network of over 400 people actively engaged in varied forms of investing in local sustainable food systems. “We’re all aware that food is connected to our political, social, environmental and economic lives," Rukin states.

 

In her afternoon address, Rukin will pose the question: “How do we, as people who care about growing and eating healthy food, ‘step up to the plate’ as we build local food economies, wherever we live, in this changing culture?” She will also talk about how SMM connects farmers, fishers and food-related businesses to funding and technical assistance, and how, from small-scale startups to large infrastructure businesses, from investment clubs to funding partnerships with foundations, from gleaning to mentoring activities, personal relationships fostered by SMM have led to significant impact. She will be available for a conversation at CEBE after her address and she encourages Festival goers to bring curiosity and questions.

 

Marge Kilkelly is both a farmer, maintaining a diversified livestock farm with her husband Joe Murray, and a policy expert in agriculture on both the state and national level. As Senior Advisor to Senator Angus King on issues related to health and agriculture, she holds a deep knowledge of U.S. farm Policy, which she will share at the Festival as she addresses the importance of the 2018 Farm Bill, which will set federal agricultural for the subsequent five years and is of critical importance to small-scale agricultural producers here in Maine.

 

Prior to her service with Senator King, Kilkelly served as assistant director of The Council of State Governments’ Eastern Regional Conference and as chair of both the Agriculture Committee in the Maine House of Representatives and the Maine Senate Agriculture Committee. She has also been economic director for The Island Institute in Rockland, Maine. And has served in various roles as an instructor at the University of Maine and New Hampshire College, and as a school food services director, head start program director, and economic development director.

 

In addition to these important keynote addresses, the Foothills Food Festival will feature educational workshops, more than a dozen food-related organizations, a regional farmers' market, live music from some of western Maine’s finest musicians, a beer garden with ten Maine brewers showcasing special brews, and of course, vendors featuring delicious food made with locally grown ingredients. For more information about the 2017 Foothills Food Festival including schedules and how to get involved please visit foothillsfoodfestival.org.

 

“For 40 years, big business and big subsidies have defined American agriculture, replacing the small, diverse farms that fed our communities for generations. Where has it gotten us? Childhood obesity, bacterial outbreaks, dependence on foreign oil, and the loss of the family farm. I believe that the solutions to these problems lie in the revival of local agriculture. Find out more about my initiatives to reform our policies to support the local food movement that has proved so healthy for Mainers and their communities, including HR 1414, the Local Farms, Food, and Jobs Act.”

Congresswoman chellie pingree, 1st district of maine

Foothills Food Festival

Longley Square, 413 Main Street
Norway, Maine

Mailing: CEBE, 447 Main Street
Norway, Maine 04268

AUGUST 11, 2018 • 12–8 • Norway, Maine

“For 40 years, big business and big subsidies have defined American agriculture, replacing the small, diverse farms that fed our communities for generations. Where has it gotten us? Childhood obesity, bacterial outbreaks, dependence on foreign oil, and the loss of the family farm. I believe that the solutions to these problems lie in the revival of local agriculture. Find out more about my initiatives to reform our policies to support the local food movement that has proved so healthy for Mainers and their communities, including HR 1414, the Local Farms, Food, and Jobs Act.”